Dogs

Life can be so hard and every day a grind. The animals are here to help if we let them.

The trend for feeding dogs raw food may be fuelling the spread of antibiotic resistant-bacteria.

Cats, especially those that sleep on their owner’s bed, seem to be particularly vulnerable. So, if you have Covid-19, I’d advise that you keep your distance from your pet and keep it out of your bedroom.

People who are infected with coronavirus give off a distinct odour, which these highly trained dogs can detect with pinpoint precision.

Scientists are reporting that they have discovered what may be the latest coronavirus to jump from animals into people. And it comes from a surprising source: dogs.

Acknowledging the animals that have had a role in life-saving vaccines and treatments for Covid-19 is not to take a position for or against their continued use in research.

There is currently no evidence that animals play a significant role in spreading the disease to people. However, infections have been confirmed in dogs, cats, apes and even mink. But are vaccines really necessary?

With people adopting pandemic puppies in droves, emotional support dogs are suddenly everywhere they’re not supposed to be. Like restaurants, supermarkets and retail stores.

Thank You by Red & Howling — 1,061,535,526 views. The overwhelming sense of gratitude for medical staff and essential workers was also universal, which is a truly beautiful thing.

Instead, the Covid-19 test is administered by one of two dogs (canines) trained to detect the virus by sniffing the sweat of arriving passengers

If doorknobs and subway poles are considered high-touch surfaces that should be disinfected regularly, why not the fur of a dog that’s just been petted at length by a stranger? If dogs were as susceptible as humans to severe disease from this virus, that would have been evident by now.

The trial will explore whether the Covid dogs made up of Labradors and cocker spaniels – can spot the virus in humans from odour samples before symptoms appear.

Read on the BBC.com


google-site-verification: googlec91776415a5bba0c.html